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Thursday, May 19, 2011

Japan back in recession

The recent earthquake and tsunami in March has sent Japan back in recession. The below is a news I stumble in during my online search for Tile Floor. It was expected to happened after the turmoil, I pray for Japan in their speeding recovery.

Japan's economy, the world's third largest, has slid back into recession after the devastation caused by the earthquake and tsunami in March.

Gross domestic product shrank 0.9% in the first three months of the year, the Cabinet office said, giving an annualised rate of contraction of 3.7%.

Analysts say consumption and exports were worst hit.

Japan's economy has now contracted for two quarters in a row, the generally accepted definition of a recession.

Japan sank into a recession during the global financial crisis, but had emerged from it in 2009.

The contraction in the first three months of this year was bigger than expected, with most analysts expecting the annualised rate would show a contraction of about 2%.

"Japan's economy is expected to remain weak for the time being," said Japanese Economics Minister Kaoru Yosano on Thursday.

However, Mr Yosano said that supply constraints were easing and reconstruction demand was likely to spur growth.

"The economy has the strength to bounce back," Mr Yosano said.

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Too many men 'unconcerned' about weight health risks

Too many men are failing to recognize the health risks of being overweight, according to Men's Health Forum chief executive Peter Baker.

He says that by not acting to tackle the problem, the NHS is making "a rod for its own back".

Women face a lot of cultural pressure to be slim. This is largely not because of health concerns and can sometimes have quite tragic consequences.

It does mean though, that many women often have a good understanding of the factors that affect their weight.

The majority of men, on the other hand, appear not to be as bothered about their weight as they maybe should be. Neither are health services.

A significantly greater proportion of men are overweight or obese (66% of men compared with 57% of women).

Too many men still die too young - 22% of men in England and Wales die before they reach 64 compared to 13% of women.

Overweight and obesity are a major factor in this excess burden of male death.

Two thirds of men are overweight or obese - the obesity rate alone could rise to 60% by 2050.

Overweight men tend to be "apple-shaped", overweight women "pear-shaped". For complex physiological and biological reasons, this extra fat around the middle causes much greater harm.

Yet many men seem unconcerned about their weight.

Their attitude is that weight is a "women's issue".

This is a cultural thing. Women face a lot more body image pressure than men, although that is starting to affect some young men too.

But generally it appears men are less aware of the connection between excess weight and poorer health.

Being overweight increases the risks of heart disease and stroke - the biggest killers of men.

It is also an important risk factor for several cancers.

Men are 70% more likely than women to die from cancers common to both sexes and 60% more likely to get such a cancer.

For a better life and a better health, not only women but men also need to take in more diet foods.